the connected educator

In order to engage in a discussion on learning and therefore the ramifications on what “teaching” is, we believe it is important to separate the brain’s function of learning with the cultural construct we define as teaching and learning. The brain is in a constant state of making meaning of the stimuli it encounters (Medina, 2014). Learning is happening in every classroom everyday….it is just a matter of WHAT learning the student actually walked away with.

Medina, J. (2014). Brain rules: 12 principles for surviving and thriving at work, home, and school. Seattle, WA: Pear Press.

Teachers are Master Learners modeling the art of discovery

Morgan Costanzo

Our curiosity about the untapped potential we have as learners inspires us to take a learning approach to teaching. Our goal is to collaborate with each student to find the most effective “way” they learn. Learning is the actual process through which students engage with new concepts or skills.

For the brain to “learn” it must construct dynamic understanding and utilize that knowledge in authentic context (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006). In order for students or athletes to authentically learn, it is essential that we deconstruct the learning process with them.  

The learning process is impacted by; how feedback is given, the biology of the brain (Medina, 2014), the encoding options provided within instruction, and the cultural values that signify what skills are most important to develop. Our goal as master learners is to discover the touchpoints in this dynamic learning process and collaborate with students in finding their “successful learning pathways.”

Medina, J. (2014). Brain rules: 12 principles for surviving and thriving at work, home, and school. Seattle, WA: Pear Press.

Tomlinson, C.A., & McTighe, J. (2006). Integrating Differentiated Instruction & Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.